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  • When we're using technology, too many of us become loud, rude, thoughtless and sometimes obnoxious. If you do any of the following things, it's time to stop.

  • Most companies need to extend their online presence beyond the desktop. This means weighing the benefits of a responsive Website compared with a mobile app.

  • Toxic co-workers arrive in all shapes and forms. There are the passive-aggressive types, the pathological liars and, of course, the bullies. If you think bullies can be found only in schoolyards, think again: As many as one-third of professionals are victims of workplace bullying, and 20 percent of these incidents cross the line into harassment, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute. Managers and team leaders must take control of these situations because bullying and other harmful office behaviors can lead to employee stress, absenteeism, low productivity and high turnover—not to mention the failure of key projects. Some incidents might even lead to lawsuits. To provide some guidance about how to handle difficult employees, we present the following nine best practices. They are adapted from a range of online resources, including the "Leadership Freak" blog and AllBusiness.com. Combined, they underscore the importance of approaching potentially destructive workers with the same kind of strategic planning that you put into a major business undertaking. The goal is to ensure that these employees have minimal negative impact on other staff, as well as business outcomes.

  • Hashtag activism has a valid place in today's world, but it shouldn't substitute genuine caring and actual cash contributions for a narcissistic iPhone moment.

  • There's no script for employees to follow that will guarantee career success, but there are certain rules of thumb that bode well for a rewarding, long-term career. For example, it's essential to exercise sound, business-focused judgment and earn a reputation as someone who can be trusted to deliver as promised. It's also important to convey a sense of professionalism and to treat people with respect. Unfortunately, too many employees lack a key quality or two, and they sometimes pay a steep price, as thousands of people are fired every day. In many cases, there are obvious reasons for these terminations, such as ineptitude or dishonesty, but other career-killers are more subtle. With this in mind, we offer the following 11 traits and actions that can sink your career. Not all will result in a pink slip, but each could stall or derail upward mobility. These missteps were adapted from a number of online resources, including those compiled by MakeItHappenNow.org, a site that offers career-advancement advice to professionals, and Monster.com, an online job search and career advice site.

  • An international environmental protection agency turned to analytics to protect endangered animals from a global network of poachers and illegal traffickers.

  • In a recent feature, we presented 10 IT certifications that result in top-paying technology jobs. Earning one of these certifications, however, doesn't necessarily guarantee a lucrative, long-term career. To build on success over decades, tech employees must also develop soft skills—interpersonal qualities such as leadership and the ability to work well with others. Clearly, they're not to be taken lightly: Ninety-three percent of employers consider a job candidate's demonstrated soft skills as being more important than their undergraduate major, according to research. Your personality and people skills—along with your ability to communicate, negotiate and lead—will dictate 85 percent of your financial success. In addition, one in five employers cite soft skills as a top reason for not hiring someone, and two-thirds of HR managers indicate they'd hire applicants with strong soft skills even if their technology skills were lacking. Have we convinced you? If so, then you'll want to take a look at the following list of 11 crucial soft skills for tech professionals. They demonstrate that soft skills are a direct reflection of your ability to shine as a team member and leader. Our list was adapted from a number of online resources, including BeMyCareerCoach.com and LiveCareer.com.

  • A nonprofit organization that helps military personnel and their spouses find work adopts a sophisticated system to automate tasks and expand capabilities.

  • A quarter century after the firewall was invented, companies are turning to sophisticated next-generation technology to address growing cyber-security risks.

  • A new report shows that job cuts in technology in the first six months of 2014 are close to the total reached for all of 2013—and could surpass it by year's end.

  • The vast majority of U.S. employees queried in a recent survey from CareerBuilder said they aren't earning what they deserve. Most of us, of course, would prefer to make more money. However, these findings demonstrate that professionals' resentment toward their employer could escalate if they conclude that they're constantly being asked to produce more with less, while making less than they should be making. Interestingly, there's apparently a difference between earning what you'd like to make and how much you need to feel successful. This reflects prior survey results Baseline presented that indicate that today's employees are considering alternatives to compensation—such as compelling assignments, flexible schedules and telecommuting options—as job rewards. "Success is relative to the type of work individuals do or their current career stage," says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. "This is healthy because it shows workers can derive meaning from their work at any level, while still striving for that next promotion or raise." The survey also sheds light on the percent of companies that openly disclose staff salaries and how this practice is perceived. More than 3,370 full-time workers and nearly 2,190 hiring managers and HR professionals took part in the research.

  • State and local government agencies are moving toward greater use of mobile technology, but many face a number of obstacles as they try to become fully mobile.

  • If you want to go to a U.S. region where IT career opportunities are on the fast track, head south. The top three states for technology job growth and newly created IT positions are all from that region, rather than from traditional tech meccas such as California, according to recently released research from Dice.com. Surprisingly, the Golden State doesn't even make the following top 10 list of states with growth in IT jobs. And the No. 1 overall state names here also ranks as having the second-largest total workforce of technology professionals (behind California), thanks to a surge of economic development in niches such as mobile, big data and software development, according to the Dice.com findings. But if the South's relatively low cost of living and perpetually warm climate doesn't interest you, don't worry: We've also included high-growth states in the West, North and Midwest. Dice.com is an online jobs and career community for tech professionals. The research was compiled primarily through data provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

  • Digital estate planning is no longer an afterthought. There's a growing array of products and services addressing the needs of the digitally deceased.

  • For many IT organizations, their resistance to adopting public clouds has given way to a more balanced perspective on the state of public cloud security.