cioinsight.com
Home > RSS Feeds > News
  • Professionals need to mind their manners in the workplace because behavior really does make a difference in a career, according to a survey from Accountemps. This can be challenging, especially when working in cramped cubicles and collaborative open spaces. "Workplace etiquette is about being aware of how your actions affect those around you," says Max Messmer, chairman of Accountemps and author of Managing Your Career For Dummies (John Wiley & Sons/available now). "Time constraints and external pressures aren't excuses for bad behavior. While it takes more than just good manners to rise through the ranks, displaying professional courtesy will help your career." As part of its research, Accountemps has compiled the following top office etiquette breaches. We've also included selected best practices for workplace decorum that were provided by the Columbia University Center for Career Education. More than 450 U.S. employees took part in the Accountemps research.

  • Almost all workers occasionally complain about their jobs, but a recently released survey conducted by the Harris Poll for Spherion reports that an overwhelming majority of employees are at least somewhat happy at work. Whether motivated by money or rewarding, interesting roles and responsibilities, many employees are finding ways to achieve career contentment. That's encouraging, especially since a significant number of them describe their organizations as stressful environments. Surprisingly, when accepting a new job, many workers are willing to give up a lot for the sake of being happier in their career. For example, some are willing to sacrifice schedule flexibility, office privacy, and a lower position or job title. "[Workers] will go to extreme lengths and make sacrifices for the sake of finding job happiness," says Sandy Mazur, division president at Spherion. "Employers have a unique opportunity to capitalize on these findings and offer small, but meaningful, opportunities that can help workers be happy in their current roles. And that can pay big dividends for the employee and the employer." More than 2,015 workers took part in the research.

  • With the rise of digital currencies like Bitcoin, anonymity and speed are increasingly attractive, but these features have drawn the attention of lawbreakers.

  • IT professionals, we want to share some important information with you. Remember how hard you worked to get into a good college and earn your degree? Well, guess what? It may not help you land that perfect tech job. At least, that's the impression given by a recent survey from Robert Half Technology. The findings reveal that the vast majority of CIOs value skills and experience more than the college degree earned, and a notable share say they care very little about the name recognition of the university an applicant attended. "A quality education provides the foundation, but IT employers want to see evidence of practical application of that knowledge," says John Reed, senior executive director of Robert Half Technology. "Job candidates with real-world IT experience can jump in and start contributing without a long ramp-up period, making them appealing to employers." To shed more insight on the topic, we're also including a list of best practices (also from Robert Half) for impressing a CIO during the recruitment process. More than 2,400 U.S. CIOs took part in the research.

  • Cortana is a top-notch virtual assistant. But here’s the most important fact: Windows 9’s killer app is Cortana, and Cortana’s killer app is Windows 9.

  • Significant numbers of IT workers are continuing to see a surge in demand for their skills, according to a recent survey from TEKsystems. In fact, the average tech professional is receiving dozens of job queries a week. This doesn't mean, however, that these employees are charting an easy path to a perfect position. In fact, most IT leaders feel that the majority of résumés received come from unqualified applicants, so there's clearly a skills gap. In addition, even promising candidates with the right skills may be hurting themselves by limiting their search efforts to job boards. "The ways in which IT professionals seek and are evaluated for job openings continue to evolve," says Jason Hayman, market research manager for TEKsystems. "Job seekers who do not adapt and adopt emerging tools like social media to identify appropriate opportunities will find it much more difficult to stay competitive with their peers. While job boards are still an important part of any job search, an over-reliance on them not only limits the pool of positions that candidates can apply for, but also decreases the likelihood of finding opportunities that are truly a good fit for an applicant's skills, experience and personality." More than 400 North American IT leaders and 900 tech professionals took part in the research.

  • When we're using technology, too many of us become loud, rude, thoughtless and sometimes obnoxious. If you do any of the following things, it's time to stop.

  • Most companies need to extend their online presence beyond the desktop. This means weighing the benefits of a responsive Website compared with a mobile app.

  • Toxic co-workers arrive in all shapes and forms. There are the passive-aggressive types, the pathological liars and, of course, the bullies. If you think bullies can be found only in schoolyards, think again: As many as one-third of professionals are victims of workplace bullying, and 20 percent of these incidents cross the line into harassment, according to the Workplace Bullying Institute. Managers and team leaders must take control of these situations because bullying and other harmful office behaviors can lead to employee stress, absenteeism, low productivity and high turnover—not to mention the failure of key projects. Some incidents might even lead to lawsuits. To provide some guidance about how to handle difficult employees, we present the following nine best practices. They are adapted from a range of online resources, including the "Leadership Freak" blog and AllBusiness.com. Combined, they underscore the importance of approaching potentially destructive workers with the same kind of strategic planning that you put into a major business undertaking. The goal is to ensure that these employees have minimal negative impact on other staff, as well as business outcomes.

  • Hashtag activism has a valid place in today's world, but it shouldn't substitute genuine caring and actual cash contributions for a narcissistic iPhone moment.

  • There's no script for employees to follow that will guarantee career success, but there are certain rules of thumb that bode well for a rewarding, long-term career. For example, it's essential to exercise sound, business-focused judgment and earn a reputation as someone who can be trusted to deliver as promised. It's also important to convey a sense of professionalism and to treat people with respect. Unfortunately, too many employees lack a key quality or two, and they sometimes pay a steep price, as thousands of people are fired every day. In many cases, there are obvious reasons for these terminations, such as ineptitude or dishonesty, but other career-killers are more subtle. With this in mind, we offer the following 11 traits and actions that can sink your career. Not all will result in a pink slip, but each could stall or derail upward mobility. These missteps were adapted from a number of online resources, including those compiled by MakeItHappenNow.org, a site that offers career-advancement advice to professionals, and Monster.com, an online job search and career advice site.

  • An international environmental protection agency turned to analytics to protect endangered animals from a global network of poachers and illegal traffickers.

  • In a recent feature, we presented 10 IT certifications that result in top-paying technology jobs. Earning one of these certifications, however, doesn't necessarily guarantee a lucrative, long-term career. To build on success over decades, tech employees must also develop soft skills—interpersonal qualities such as leadership and the ability to work well with others. Clearly, they're not to be taken lightly: Ninety-three percent of employers consider a job candidate's demonstrated soft skills as being more important than their undergraduate major, according to research. Your personality and people skills—along with your ability to communicate, negotiate and lead—will dictate 85 percent of your financial success. In addition, one in five employers cite soft skills as a top reason for not hiring someone, and two-thirds of HR managers indicate they'd hire applicants with strong soft skills even if their technology skills were lacking. Have we convinced you? If so, then you'll want to take a look at the following list of 11 crucial soft skills for tech professionals. They demonstrate that soft skills are a direct reflection of your ability to shine as a team member and leader. Our list was adapted from a number of online resources, including BeMyCareerCoach.com and LiveCareer.com.

  • A nonprofit organization that helps military personnel and their spouses find work adopts a sophisticated system to automate tasks and expand capabilities.