cioinsight.com
Home > RSS Feeds > IT Management
  • When you're an IT professional, you have to take the good with the bad, and, fortunately, most tech pros have adopted a half-full perspective, according to an "IT Pros Survey" recently released by SolarWinds. IT staffers continue to work long days: Many put in 20 or more overtime hours in a month, and many do so without being compensated for the extra time. And a lot of their day is spent fixing issues that users (including executives and staffers) attempt to resolve on their own, but sometimes end up making worse. Surprisingly, some IT employees also contribute to this problem. Despite this, an overwhelming majority of survey respondents said they really like—or love—what they do. Maybe it's because they realize how valued they are, or because they truly enjoy working with technology. "In 2016, we found that IT is everywhere, and end-users were expanding IT beyond the traditional four walls of their organizations," said Joseph Kim, executive vice president and chief technology officer at SolarWinds. "This required IT professionals to adopt an 'always-on' mentality. This year's key findings highlight that the trend continues, with IT pros performing their core IT responsibilities, in addition to dedicating time to educate end-users and business leaders, problem-solving for senior executives and keeping their organizations secure from the threat of security breaches." More than 160 IT professionals, managers and directors in the United States and Canada took part in the research.

  • While the majority of organizations anticipate hiring more open-source professionals over the next six months, an even greater number are struggling to recruit qualified candidates for their open positions, according to a recent survey from the Linux Foundation and Dice. The accompanying report, "Open-Source Jobs Report: Employers Prioritize Hiring Open-Source Professionals With Latest Skills," paints an optimistic picture for open source as a career pursuit: Employers are scrambling to fill open positions to enhance the DevOps and app development capabilities in their company. They're especially eager to hire a candidate who has certifications, and, if not, they're often willing to help pay for the cost of getting certifications. Meanwhile, open-source pros are constantly getting recruiting calls, leading most of them to believe that it would be easy to find another job. "As open source becomes increasingly relevant and more companies globally leverage the technology in their stacks, demand for professionals with open-source experience will only intensify," said Michael Durney, president and CEO of DHI Group, which owns Dice. "Successful employers recognize that open-source professionals will look at things beyond just the compensation, and will, for instance, express the opportunity to work on challenging projects during the recruiting process. Those firms [that] foster a spirit of teamwork and promote paths for professionals to advance their careers within the organization will attract highly skilled, passionate tech talent and, in turn, propel innovation forward for the future." More than 280 global hiring managers and 1,800 open-source professionals took part in the research.

  • A majority of consumers said poor website or app performance will negatively affect their brand loyalty, according to a recent survey from Apica. The resulting report, "Digital Desertion: The Rise of Consumer Web and App Expectations and the Impact of Negative Experiences," reveals that a notable share of survey respondents said slow-loading pages and apps would cause them to never return to a site for goods or services. So how long is too long to wait? For most survey respondents, 20 seconds represents the cut-off point. What's more, if they get fed up with these issues, there's a high likelihood they'd tell their friends and colleagues about the negative experience, further damaging a brand's reputation. "Digital consumers have limited patience for slow performance or delays," said Carmen Carey, CEO of Apica. "There is clearly a general expectation that sites and apps will perform faster and better, particularly with the advent of 'born digital' organizations. The onus is now on businesses, whether they're a leading financial company or an online retailer, to ensure peak performance at all times." A total of 1,000 users and consumers took part in the research.

  • Despite efforts to improve employee-to-employee communications, the vast majority of organizations still find it challenging to keep key projects on track, according to a recent survey from Clarizen. Very few, for example, describe the productivity levels of their teams as "excellent." Collaborative software would help, most survey respondents agreed, but relatively few of the companies in the survey are actually deploying such tech tools. In hopes of finding a better way, many are turning to cloud-based communications and/or file-sharing products, or even switching email platforms. But these steps may not completely address the core problems. "There's no doubt that leveraging technologies to improve the lines of communication among employees is important, but communicating is not the same as collaborating," said Anne Catambay, vice president of marketing at Clarizen. "Collaborating applies to working with others on a project that has a definitive start date, deliverables and an end date. Colleagues can hold multiple meetings or send regular updates to each other, but that's not getting work done. Project leaders need to set deadlines, eliminate redundant tasks, provide employees with the time and space they need to focus on their work, and foster transparency." Nearly 300 global managers and employees took part in the research.

  • The digitization of today's workplace is all about empowering modern professionals with lots of cool technologies. But, amid all the buzz about the latest business-benefiting apps and platforms, too many organizations are overlooking a very basic need: to eliminate many paper-based processes. That's the impression conveyed by a recent survey from Y Soft. The resulting report, "Digital Transformation Expectations in the Workforce," reveals that the majority of employees—many of them young and tech-savvy—feel that their company still depends on too many paper-driven processes that could be digitized. Many of the survey respondents believe that the huge volume of printing in organizations has a negative impact on the environment. Others said that their employer has not even developed policies about how printing should be done to save on paper usage, such as printing on both sides of a page. The findings also cover employee adoption of cloud storage, and the preference for greater flexibility in working hours, and we've included those here. A total of 100 U.S. workers from 18 to 44 years of age took part in the research.

  • Establishing a DevOps strategy and putting it into motion can prove extremely challenging. Success depends on factors such as technology, processes and culture.

  • While the majority of IT professionals are familiar with the concept of digital experience monitoring (DEM), only a small minority of organizations are actually deploying these solutions, according to a recent survey from SolarWinds. The resulting report, "Digital Experience Monitoring (DEM): Survey of IT Professionals," reveals that most companies are at least starting to develop a DEM strategy. They're doing so because, for many, negative digital customer-related experiences are common, and a notable number of tech teams are devoting a considerable number of hours every week to these issues. Through better digital monitoring tools, they hope to eliminate slow digital performance for customers and/or website and app downtime, while more effectively troubleshooting customer experience (CX) problems. "We live in a highly digital world where companies can no longer take a passive approach to the digital experience of their customers—it's an organization's most important competitive advantage and makes all the difference between a good or bad customer experience," said Christoph Pfister, executive vice president of products for SolarWinds. More than 240 North American IT professionals took part in the research, which was conducted by Penton Research.

  • The majority of C-level executives reported that, though improving, the skills gap is still very real, and many said their organization is willing to pay above market averages for salaries and will also provide a broad range of benefits, according to a recent survey from Adecco USA. The resulting report, "Best-in-Class Workforce Management Insights: Engaging Employees in an Ever-Changing Landscape," divides companies into categories that include "Best-in-Class" and "Industry Laggards," with the former organizations compensating employees better and retaining them longer. Best-in-class employers also excel at getting their new hires to reach needed productivity levels in less time than laggards do. In many cases, they're even willing to offer work-life balance as a stated benefit. "Over the last year, as the unemployment rate has declined and the competition for talent has intensified, we've reported that we're working in 'The Age of the Employee,'" according to the report. "In this candidate-driven market, the burden is on employers to offer compelling reasons for candidates to join—and remain with—their organizations. And the most compelling thing an employer can offer—one that goes hand-in-hand with engagement, productivity and loyalty—is happiness. You can't make employees happy. But you can foster a positive work environment that results in engaged, productive and successful employees who love what they do." More than 500 C-suite executives took part in the research.

  • Remember when IT professionals voiced significant concerns about cyber-security and the cloud? Well, while data protection remains a key issue, a clear majority of these tech pros and C-suite executives now have a different kind of fear—the "fear of missing out" (FOMO)—with respect to the cloud, according to a recent survey from Commvault. The resulting report, "2017 Executive Cloud Survey: What IT Leaders Are Worried About," reveals that most survey respondents said it's challenging to keep up with the latest offerings from cloud providers. Information assurance also remains a key issue, as the majority said they have misgivings about whether they are able to quickly recover data from the cloud. Clearly, while cloud migration can present great opportunities for innovation, it's best to come up with a well-designed, long-range cloud deployment plan to ensure that IT investments are made wisely. "For companies of all sizes, cloud is no longer optional: It's a requirement in today's data-driven business landscape," according to the report. "To keep up, many companies have migrated quickly, without fully fashioning a strategy for their cloud deployment. As a result, businesses often find their lofty expectations are met by a cloud reality that is more difficult than anticipated. Many cloud adopters want the flexible, accessible data storage that the cloud provides, but end up facing data management problems. CIOs also often think the cloud will be more cost-efficient, but that isn't always the case." A total of 100 IT professionals and C-suite executives took part in the research, which was conducted by CITO Research.

  • The road to digital transformation is paved with more than a few obstacles. But one thing that's often overlooked—particularly with today's focus on highly agile and flexible IT infrastructures—is the need for efficient and streamlined software development. A recent report from business-management software vendor Appian and IT consulting firm Forrester Research, "Power Your Enterprise's Digital Initiatives with Low-Code Platforms," examines the software development space. It points out that organizations can achieve faster delivery of large, complex, reliable customer solutions by adopting a low-code approach. The report, which polled executives at 209 organizations across the United States and Canada, predicts that the market for low-code platforms will expand to more than $10 billion in revenue by 2019. Among the key findings: A low-code approach can solve delivery-speed challenges more cost-effectively than traditional development methods, while improving customer satisfaction and boosting strategic competitive differentiation. Here's a look at some of the key findings.

  • Business leaders who relegate social media to the marketing group and don't make it a board-level consideration are underestimating the damage it can cause.