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  • Most chief compliance officers don't think they have enough budget or resources to protect their company from risk, and they could use additional tools from the IT organization to improve the situation, according to a recent survey from PwC. The resulting report, "Risk in Review: Going the Distance," distinguishes companies that are "high performers" in achieving optimal risk agility and risk resiliency. Organizations that are strong on risk agility are able to build flexible risk management frameworks that can anticipate and prepare for shifts that can bring long-term success. Companies that are effective on risk resiliency can mitigate risk events, while keeping business on track to meet strategic goals. Businesses that struggle in these areas generally do not use risk dashboards and visualizations to get a better sense of potential compliance issues. They also don't use data analytics to identify new opportunities. By addressing these and other success factors to overcome risk-related challenges, companies can expect higher revenue, while gaining a competitive edge in their industry. "Companies today that leverage risk management as both an offensive and defensive tactic are leading the way in maintaining long-term success," said Dean Simone, leader of the U.S. Risk Assurance practice at PwC. "Finding that right median will come differently to companies and industries across the board, but the key is to strike a balance that allows for growth at a comfortable pace, relevant to the risk appetite and tolerance levels set by management and accepted by the board." Nearly 1,680 CEOs, CIOs, risk and compliance officers, and other executives took part in the research.

  • What's unbelievable about the ransomware epidemic is the number of successful attacks on business, government and others—a number that should be a big fat zero.

  • Trust in and adoption of cloud computing continues to grow despite persistent cloud-related security and compliance concerns. Such is the overarching takeaway of Intel Security's recent report, "Blue Skies Ahead? The State of Cloud Adoption." The report, which was based on a survey Vanson Bourne did of 1,200 IT decision-makers with responsibility for cloud security, illustrates just how much impact security concerns still have over cloud decisions. "We are at the tipping point of investment and adoption, expanding rapidly as trust in cloud computing and cloud providers grows," said Raj Samani, chief technology officer, Intel Security EMEA. "As we enter a phase of wide-scale adoption of cloud computing to support critical applications and services, the question of trust within the cloud becomes imperative." Still, the lingering security concerns don't seem to be slowing the cloud's momentum, as the survey findings indicate that organizations intend to plow ahead into cloud deployments even though they often don't fully understand the risks. That contradiction puts extra pressure on vendors to get it right. "Security vendors and cloud providers must arm customers with education and tools, and cultivate strong relationships built on trust, in order to continue the adoption of cloud computing platforms," said Jim Reavis, CEO of the Cloud Security Alliance. "Only then can we completely benefit from the advantages of the cloud."

  • Corporations must prepare for regulatory inquiries and arm against data breaches. That should start with proactive, strategic information governance practices.

  • Enterprises that adopt a mobile-first strategy can achieve transformative results, including improvements in customer loyalty, market share and productivity.

  • The majority of hiring managers predict that the demand for open-source IT professionals will rise more than other recruitment-based areas of interest over the next six months, according to a recent survey from the Linux Foundation and Dice. The resulting report, "Moving Toward Professionalization: Rising Need for Open-Source Skills in 2016," indicates that these managers struggle to fill open-source positions, especially when trying to find candidates with needed cloud, networking and/or security experience. Meanwhile, when considering an offer, open-source professionals said they're most interested in working on appealing projects with cutting-edge technology challenges. Money and perks are of secondary interest, even though, given the hot market, many open-source specialists are able to negotiate a great compensation package. According to the report, "In the last decade, open-source development has experienced a massive shift: Once a mostly community and volunteer-based concern, the model has since become a mainstay of the IT industry. Flexibility in accommodating new technologies and speed at adapting to a changing market have made open source vital to modern companies, which are now investing zealously in open source and open-source talent. More and better code is the way forward, and the skilled professionals who can make it happen are highly in demand." More than 400 hiring managers and 4,500 open-source professionals took part in the research.

  • If it seems as if the cyber-security landscape just keeps getting more threatening, you're not imagining things. For example, in February, Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center in Los Angeles paid 40 bitcoins—about $17,000—to unlock its computer systems after a ransomware attack shut down its IT systems for nearly two weeks. How can organizations prepare for and respond to cyber-attacks? One promising method involves sharing information and intelligence. A study of 500 cyber-security professionals conducted by Intel Security, the 2016 "McAfee Labs Threats Report," found that ransomware is rampant, and mobile malware is growing. Yet, the use of defense tools such as information sharing and cyber-threat intelligence (CTI) can pay big dividends. Unfortunately, "High-value CTI must overcome the barriers of organizational policies, regulatory restrictions, risks associated with attribution, trust and a lack of implementation knowledge before its potential can be fully realized," said Vincent Weafer, vice president of Intel Security's McAfee Labs group. "Given the determination demonstrated by cyber-criminals, CTI sharing will become an important tool in tilting the cyber-security balance of power in favor of defenders."

  • DonorsChoose.org, an educational charity that gives equipment and supplies to schools, takes a dollars-and-sense approach to fundraising with financial software.

  • A significant percent of U.S. professionals are "boomerang" workers—people who have returned to work for an ex-employer—according to a recent survey from Spherion. Findings reveal that even more of the respondents are open to this idea, saying they'd consider returning to a former employer if the salary was tempting enough, if the company offered a more flexible schedule, or if there was an opportunity to work in a position created specifically for them. In other words, boomerang employees are becoming more typical, which is another reason not to burn bridges on your way out the door. "Because the boomerang concept is growing in popularity as a job-seeking strategy and is accepted by a majority of American workers, both employees and employers should be rethinking their approach to each phase of the employment lifecycle," said Sandy Mazur, division president at Spherion. "For example, employees should carefully manage their exit in case they want to return down the road, and employers should cast their recruitment net wider to include those who may be looking to come back." More than 1,000 U.S. workers took part in the research, which was conducted by Research Now. 

  • The MIT Sloan CIO Symposium focused on "Thriving in the Digital Economy," with topics ranging from the gig economy to big data to the IoT and security.

  • Skyscanner, an online travel marketplace, deployed a squad collaboration structure and service desk software to deliver a world-class product to travelers.

  • Over the last few years, cyber-security vulnerabilities and threats have grown rapidly, and addressing them has become infinitely more complex. At this point, it is obvious that it's not a question of whether a breach will occur, but when. Inboxes, Web pages, databases and more are all under heavy assault. Worse, a breach has growing economic consequences for companies large and small. It can damage a brand's image and can also hemorrhage money. A recent report from SailPoint, "2016 Market Pulse Survey: Weak Security Practices Leave Organizations Exposed," paints a disturbing picture of the current situation. The study of 1,000 office workers globally found that a shocking number of them are willing to steal and sell passwords to third-party organizations (in many cases, for less than $1,000). Another problem is that organizations are slow to cut off systems access when an employee leaves. In addition, shadow IT, which may circumvent security controls, is rampant. According to the report, "No company is safe from attacks, and the method by which information is taken is slowly changing. The commonality across almost every breach is that hackers are now targeting the weakest link in the security infrastructure: people." Here's a look at some of the report's key findings.

  • ASD Healthcare, a major pharmaceutical wholesaler, builds a global communications network to enable remote monitoring and boost the collection of critical data.

  • A great salary probably isn't the only reason you'd accept a job offer. But if you could work in a company with a great culture—one that combines a challenging, inspiring and fun work environment with an awesome compensation package—you'd undoubtedly find that very hard to turn down.  With this in mind, we're presenting the following list of the 10 highest-paying technology companies. They were compiled from the recently published "25 Highest Paying Companies in America" ranking from Glassdoor. Our tech industry-specific list includes the usual suspects, such as Google, Facebook and Twitter, but none of these major players snagged the No. 1 position. Overall, the list validates the fact that talented IT professionals are in a great position to negotiate for generous compensation packages, as organizations continue to struggle to fill tech positions with qualified candidates. In fact, 20 of the overall 25 highest paying organizations are tech companies. "High pay continues to be tied to in-demand skills and higher education," said Dr. Andrew Chamberlain, chief economist at Glassdoor. "In technology, we continue to see unprecedented salaries as the war for talent is still very active, largely due to the ongoing shortage of highly skilled workers needed." This ranking is based on salary reports that employees anonymously and voluntarily posted on the Glassdoor site. To provide further insights about each tech company, we're also featuring employee comments that were posted.

  • The boundaries of cyber-warfare are expanding, but with few of the restrictions that apply to conventional warfare. And justifications for cyber-war are murky.