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  • A significant share of IT leaders liken today's "application economy" to a disruptive force of nature, according to a recent survey conducted by Vanson Bourne for CA Technologies. The accompanying report, "How to Survive and Thrive in the Application Economy," demonstrates how customer demand and competitive considerations are pressuring IT organizations to generate more apps, faster than ever. The majority of survey respondents said that they have either purchased or will acquire new software to increase their app-delivery capabilities, as these investments are now considered a "must have" to keep up with business-based expectations. "There is clear evidence that enterprises of all sizes, in all markets, have to embrace the application economy, and place software development and delivery at the center of their business strategy," says John Michelsen, CTO at CA Technologies. "Business success is tied to application performance, and the ability of a business to drive growth is no longer just about the products or services they deliver, but increasingly about a complete software-driven experience." The report divides organizations into "leaders" and "laggards" to represent differences in their responses to the app economy, noting that the former group is growing revenue at more than twice the rate of the latter. A total of 1,450 global senior IT leaders took part in the research.

  • Research shows that only 14 percent of companies have a female CEO, and women make up only 20 percent of the C-suite but fill 55 percent of administrative jobs.

  • Starting an information lifecycle governance program and improving your organization’s information economics will take time, commitment and resources. 

  • A significant number of employees say they've been bullied on the job, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. Many have even left their company due to the problem, and a stunningly high percentage of physically disabled workers say they've been bullied at work—a finding that seems hard to fathom. What defines bullying? While often a gray area, it typically involves what CareerBuilder describes as a "gross lack of professionalism, consideration and respect" that involves "intimidation, personal insults or behavior that is more passive-aggressive." Whatever the form, these practices appear to affect a lot of professionals, regardless of their background or organizational standing. "Bullying impacts workers of all backgrounds, regardless of race, education, income and level of authority within an organization," says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. "Many of the workers who have experienced this don't confront the bully or elect not to report the incidents, which can prolong a negative work experience that leads some to leave their jobs." Clearly, bullying is a serious workplace issue that management must address. More than 3,370 employees took part in the research.

  • For companies to succeed in the future, they will have to meet the high standards and requirements that Millennials have for mobile technologies and functions. For example, a significant percentage of young adults in the workforce want to use their smartphone's camera to perform daily tasks, such as depositing checks, signing up for health insurance and paying bills, according to a recent survey from Mitek. Why wouldn't they, when they use cameras to record virtually every aspect of their lives? Given the dominance of image-driven capabilities on mobile tools, IT departments should start thinking—now, rather than later—about how to adapt their consumer-facing services to accommodate camera-based interactions, rather than asking customers to manually type information into a field. "While it shouldn't be surprising that [Millennials'] smartphones never leave their sides, we also found that the role of the camera on a mobile device cannot be minimized," says James DeBello, Mitek's president and CEO. "The love of snapping selfies could be written off as a fad, but Millennials are telling us that this is how they want to bank, shop, find health care and enroll in classes." More than 1,000 U.S. Millennials took part in the research.

  • An integration specialist offers insights into how the next version of the Windows OS will affect the enterprise, including migration and deployment concerns.

  • According to a recent survey, the best tech company in the world is not Google, Twitter or any of the other "usual suspects" that frequently dominate "best employer" lists. Instead, it's a company that specializes in the more traditional world of cloud-based human resources and finance applications. But don't worry: Google and Twitter still show up in this top 10 list, which was published by Great Place to Work's "Great Rated!" Companies were selected based on average scores provided by nearly 50,000 employee survey participants. Great Rated! has actually cited 20 companies overall, broken down into categories of large enterprises and small/medium businesses, but the following is the top 10 ranking. Given the well-reported struggles that organizations in all industries face in hiring qualified technology professionals, most could probably benefit from introducing at least some of the following cultural practices of these tech companies. (The cultural practices were compiled from news articles and online job reviews, as well as the companies' Websites.)

  • Chambers Gasket & Manufacturing integrated its cloud-based CRM and ERP systems, enabling staff to access customer data on their mobile devices from any location.

  • When it's time to make a major decision at your organization—one that can translate into a significant profit or loss over the next year—how do your senior executives proceed? Do they rely on intuition or data analytics? A research report from PwC conveys a mixed portrait: Executives worldwide said they recognize the growing influence big data has on critical business strategies and decisions. However, they also reported that their own experience and instincts—as well as those of colleagues and employees—play a major role. In other words, companies are moving forward with a balanced blend of human and metrics-based thinking. "A company's success today is tied to how good it is at making big decisions," says Dan DiFilippo, PwC's global and U.S. data and analytics leader. "While executives say they continue to rely on experience, advice or their own gut instinct, they also see investment in data and analytics as critical to success. Experience and intuition and the use of data and analytics are not mutually exclusive. The challenge for business is how best to marry the two." A total of 1,135 global senior executives took part in the research.

  • As long as data isn't misused or abused, what could be fairer than paying for products and services based on actual consumption rather than aggregate models?

  • Just when you've gotten used to Windows 8, get ready for yet another version of the operating system: After a public preview this fall, Microsoft anticipates releasing Windows 10 in mid-2015. It's expected to serve as the most enterprise-focused version yet, with a lot of emphasis on productivity-boosting business features. As a multiplatform product, it will run on PCs, tablets, Windows Phones and eventually the Xbox. Many users will be happy to learn that the original Start button and Menu are coming back. (Microsoft ditched both with Windows 8.) And the new version won't abruptly switch you from a traditional Windows layout to that funky app interface, because all programs will appear in the customary Windows setting we're all used to. You may wonder why Windows 10 isn't named "Windows 9." (Did Microsoft think we wouldn't notice?) Promising to transform the brand to align with the fast pace of consumer-driven technology changes, Microsoft points out that the number "10" represents "a whole new generation of Windows." So you can expect quicker, more incremental Windows releases now—instead of grand debuts—to mirror the way mobile apps get updated. Given the interest in this operating system, we're presenting the following 11 fascinating facts about the long line of Windows products—facts that were compiled from news accounts and online resources.

  • A new study shows that most data scientists around the world believe a set of ethical standards should exist when it comes to data collection and research.

  • IT professionals should benefit significantly from a surge in job creation over the next few years, according to research published by Modis IT Staffing. The accompanying report, the "2015 Salary Guide for IT Professionals," predicts that the growth of new technology jobs being created will rise at a far higher rate than overall employment growth. In addition, women will account for a greater share of the overall IT workforce. It's also encouraging to learn that a significant number of U.S. men and women serving overseas consider technology the top vocational choice for their post-military careers, according to the survey. The guide breaks out a number of key IT niches for job growth—along with average salary figures within each niche—and we're presenting some of those statistics in the slideshow below. As a bonus, we're also including best practices for getting that perfect and well-paying tech job. Modis has based its findings on information obtained through a partnership with CareerBliss and its internal data, as well as that from local clients and IT professionals in the market.

  • The growing demand for self-service analytics that will give employees better, easier access to data was a major focus at the 2014 Dreamforce conference.

  • Some industry experts view mobility as the foundation of the digital enterprise, which will include the Internet of things, social, analytics and crowdsourcing.