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  • When IT staffs devote most of their time to day-to-day tasks such as managing hardware, software and networks and resolving issues, they have little time to devote to innovation. That's risky, given the growing need to improve customer engagement, adopt the internet of things (IoT), and leverage the use of big data and analytics. The lack of strategic thinking, along with the required investment in people, process, tools and technology, could lead to missed market opportunities. An IDC survey of IT managers in 275 large organizations in 10 countries reveals that enterprises have varying rates of investment in their IT infrastructure and operations, with most adopting automation for monitoring and support only. "Optimization Drives Digital Transformation," a study sponsored by information and communications technology provider Dimension Data, suggests that enterprises need to deliver IT services more efficiently by using new automation technologies and leveraging external partnerships. Though most of the managers surveyed view IT operations and infrastructure as critical to digital transformation, only a minority said their organization is fully automated. "Forward-thinking business leaders are developing their IT to achieve digital transformation now, in anticipation of future market opportunities," said Bill Padfield, Dimension Data's group executive for services. "Flexible, scalable and agile infrastructures are needed to support these new developments, and optimizing infrastructure through automation is key to this effort."

  • The recent ransomware attack on an Austrian Hotel's room key system may have served as a wake-up call about the expanding risks introduced by the internet of things, but, as they say in show business, "You ain't seen nothing yet!" The emergence of IoT botnets has made fighting cyber-criminals even more difficult. An endless array of devices, many of which are equipped with little or no on-board security, can now be exploited to overwhelm targets with larger, more frequent attacks. Such is one of the key findings of "Arbor Networks' 12th annual Worldwide Infrastructure Security Report." "The survey respondents have grown accustomed to a constantly evolving threat environment, with steady increases in attack size and complexity over the past decade," said Darren Anstee, Arbor's chief security technologist. "However, IoT botnets are a game-changer because of the numbers involved. There are billions of these devices deployed, and they are being easily weaponized to launch massive attacks." Nearly two-thirds of the 356 network and security professionals Arbor surveyed represent service providers, while the rest are from companies in the enterprise, government and education segments.

  • The firm uses self-service BI dashboards that enable business users to drill down into any set of data at will, without intervention required on the part of IT.

  • No matter how highly skilled and experienced you are, you won't get very far in the job market with a weak résumé. Recruiters spend, on average, just 3.14 minutes reading a résumé, and they usually make up their mind about a candidate's worthiness within the first minute, research shows. One in five hiring managers will reject a candidate before they finish reading the résumé. Six out of 10 of them will do so due to poor grammar or spelling, and more than half will reject a candidate because of a wealth of clichés in the résumé. The upshot: While what you include in a résumé is obviously essential, what you leave out is also important. To provide some guidance, we've come up with the following list of words and phrases that you should never include, adapted from a list recently published by Glassdoor. In some cases, the words and phrases are simply unnecessary or repetitive. In others, they're overused, or are stale examples of jargon or tired buzz phrases. By packing these words into a résumé, you divert attention from what employers are really looking for: summaries of how you made a difference for your organization.

  • All types of businesses can benefit from digital platforms, but most new digital platforms will fail if companies neglect the five key steps to digital success.

  • It's nearly impossible for employees to avoid a toxic co-worker at some point in their careers. In fact, four out of five employees surveyed either currently work with, or have worked with, a colleague who spreads malicious rumors, unfairly blames others, and exhibits excessive negativity or other inappropriate behaviors, according to research. Even worse, the vast majority of these employees said their managers are either somewhat or extremely tolerant of these troublemakers, and only two out of five bosses said they'd fire a difficult team member, even if the bothersome behavior was damaging morale. (However, nearly nine out of 10 employees said they would be quite willing to do so.) Clearly, toxic co-workers can create a complicated mess, but such dysfunction should not damage your daily objectives or long-term career aspirations. By considering the following 10 tips for dealing with toxic co-workers, you can either avoid or mitigate the fallout. While many of the tips apply to bad co-workers in general, there are a few that directly address particular types of these workers, including the bully, drama queen and slacker. Our tips are compiled from a number of online resources, including Monster.com and Salary.com.

  • A majority of middle-market companies will spend up to 10 percent of their budget on technology, including product and service innovation and core technologies.

  • Artificial Intelligence (AI) is emerging as a fundamental success driver for global organizations, dramatically increasing efficiencies while cutting costs, according to a recent survey from Infosys. The accompanying report, "Amplifying Human Potential: Towards Purposeful Artificial Intelligence," indicates that most companies are either fully or partially deploying this technology, and that they're happy with the results. Among other anticipated outcomes, they're seeking to gain competitive advantage through AI, while solving business, operational and/or technology issues. Of course, there are concerns—including a fear of change among employees and the potential impact on data safety and job security—that could present barriers. However, momentum for continued exploration and implementation currently appears unstoppable. "AI is inevitable," according to the report. "Some organizations already find themselves actively exploring how the technology can work for them, while many remain focused on planning their approach. What is clear, however, is that the successful use of AI requires balance: greater automation versus employee engagement, and customer satisfaction versus changing business models. The goal is to harness the vast array of possible rewards while minimizing the many potential risks." An estimated 1,600 global IT and business decision-makers took part in the research.

  • If companies can't bring the world's top talent to the U.S.—a foundation of the tech industry—it's unclear how the U.S. will retain a leadership position.

  • Moffatt & Nichol, a global civil engineering firm, adopted a hybrid cloud storage system to make information easily accessible by workers in disparate offices.

  • Hiring prospects for the year ahead have climbed to their highest level in a decade, with a continued, intense demand to fill tech positions driving the optimistic forecast, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. Overall, organizations are expected to boost the staffing of full-time permanent workers, part-timers and contractual employees. In addition, recruiters will prioritize IT-related vacancies over all others. As a result, IT candidates will be in a position to receive higher salary offers—especially if they have the right mix of "hard" tech experience and capabilities and "soft" communications-based skills. In fact, companies are so eager to fill openings that the majority of them are willing to hire and then train professionals on the job when they don't have the experience required for the role. Employers "are in a better financial position than they were a year ago, which is instilling more confidence in adding people to their payrolls," said Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation. "Following a divisive election season, employers are entering the New Year with a watchful, yet optimistic approach. One of the key challenges for employers will be bridging the talent gaps within their own organizations by either offering better wages or by helping to re-skill and up-skill workers." Nearly 2,400 hiring managers and HR professionals took part in the research, which was conducted by Harris Poll.

  • The state's 14 agencies needed a way to track and secure all devices accessing the network. They deployed a system that provided continuous endpoint protection.

  • Augmented reality may be a new technology for many, but there are intriguing options to explore because of the numerous potential applications in the workplace.

  • Marketing executives are commanding an ever-growing piece of the IT budget, so it makes sense to get their take on which technologies are getting their attention. But it turns out that their take is a bit conflicted. A recent survey of 620 marketers from the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Germany and Australia, which was conducted by marketing software-maker Marketo, reports a notable difference in approaches between American marketers and their overseas counterparts when it comes to using emerging technologies to engage with customers. Specifically, it seems non-U.S. marketers are more willing to jump into new technologies before they know their potential customer service value, whereas American marketers are more heavily informed by what their customers are already doing. "While U.S. teams are more focused on figuring out the 'whys' behind customer behavior, European marketers in particular are usually ahead of the curve in adopting cool technology," Chandar Pattabhiram, Marketo's chief marketing officer, wrote in a recent blog post on the findings. One technology that's high on the priority list is predictive analytics. "As emerging technologies like the internet of things and virtual reality are increasingly adopted by consumers and businesses—bringing massive data volumes with them—we'll see the need for behavior-driven analytics continue to grow," Pattabhiram said.

  • Now is the time for business to take the initiative and proactively encourage women to enter and remain in the data science and engineering fields.