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  • It wasn't that long ago that the CIO's place in the C-suite was questioned, and the role was marginalized by other executives who felt CIOs should just focus on software and hardware. Well, that attitude is nothing compared to the beating chief information security officers (CISOs) take in a recent survey conducted by ThreatTrack Security. The security vendor surveyed more than 200 C-level executives this summer, and the findings indicate that information security leaders have some work to do if they want to earn the respect of their C-level peers. Responding executives made it clear that they do not view CISOs as equals, and they sometimes even blame CISOs for undermining the bottom line. "CISOs are often viewed simply as convenient scapegoats in the event of a headline-grabbing data breach, and they are significantly undervalued for the work they do every day to keep corporate data secure," says Julian Waits, Sr., CEO of ThreatTrack. "This perception needs to change, as CISOs—and the teams that work with them—should be viewed as drivers for business protection and growth." ThreatTrack offers some suggestions for CISOs who want to enhance their image in their company. Among these: Formalize your role; develop and communicate a strong security strategy; forge strong relationships with other C-level execs; and focus on the economic impact of risk and develop metrics that illustrate the financial impact of security efforts.

  • A new report shows that job cuts in technology in the first six months of 2014 are close to the total reached for all of 2013—and could surpass it by year's end.

  • By virtually any standard, Pope Francis has become a beloved and effective world leader. He lives in a modest guesthouse instead of the Apostolic Palace. He wears the same cross he wore when he was a cardinal. And he gave up the famed Mercedes-Benz Popemobile in favor of a 30-year-old Renault. More important, his words and actions have gained favor with a broad range of global citizens, regardless of their faith. The book Lead with Humility: 12 Leadership Lessons from Pope Francis (Amacom/available in September) frames the life and accomplishments of the pope in the context of today's business environment. Author Jeffrey Krames explains how the pope's humble yet candid approach can be easily adopted by business leaders who need to engage their staff in order to effectively accomplish organizational goals. While Pope Francis is a very likeable figure, history will ultimately evaluate him based on what he accomplishes. The following nine takeaways for IT team leaders are adapted from the lessons highlighted in the book. Krames is CEO and president of JK Literary Services, a publishing and literary agency specializing in leadership, management and business books.

  • The vast majority of U.S. employees queried in a recent survey from CareerBuilder said they aren't earning what they deserve. Most of us, of course, would prefer to make more money. However, these findings demonstrate that professionals' resentment toward their employer could escalate if they conclude that they're constantly being asked to produce more with less, while making less than they should be making. Interestingly, there's apparently a difference between earning what you'd like to make and how much you need to feel successful. This reflects prior survey results Baseline presented that indicate that today's employees are considering alternatives to compensation—such as compelling assignments, flexible schedules and telecommuting options—as job rewards. "Success is relative to the type of work individuals do or their current career stage," says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. "This is healthy because it shows workers can derive meaning from their work at any level, while still striving for that next promotion or raise." The survey also sheds light on the percent of companies that openly disclose staff salaries and how this practice is perceived. More than 3,370 full-time workers and nearly 2,190 hiring managers and HR professionals took part in the research.

  • State and local government agencies are moving toward greater use of mobile technology, but many face a number of obstacles as they try to become fully mobile.

  • The rapid advance of digital technology is changing the stakes for business and IT leaders, who need a strategy to conquer challenges and exploit opportunities.

  • Have you always considered yourself management material, but are still waiting for that elusive promotion? It's a universal challenge for employees: Many professionals want to move into management, but there are obviously only so many of those positions available. And organizations need to be circumspect when it comes to making such promotions, especially when you consider the fact that four out of five people who become managers turn out to be wrong for the position, according to industry research. Clearly, if you do get that promotion, you want to be ready for the job. So you may want to read Becoming the Boss: New Rules for the Next Generation of Leaders (HarperCollins/available in September). This book provides concrete, actionable guidelines to help you attain a management position—and excel at it. Author Lindsey Pollak positions the book for Gen Y readers, but her advice on presentations, social media, project leadership and professional presence applies to a broad range of demographics. What's key is to understand that to be considered for career advancement, you have to go beyond simply doing your job well. You also have to inspire others to perform better at their jobs. The following nine takeaways were adapted from Pollak's book. She is a speaker and consultant who specializes in career topics for Millennials.

  • If you want to go to a U.S. region where IT career opportunities are on the fast track, head south. The top three states for technology job growth and newly created IT positions are all from that region, rather than from traditional tech meccas such as California, according to recently released research from Dice.com. Surprisingly, the Golden State doesn't even make the following top 10 list of states with growth in IT jobs. And the No. 1 overall state names here also ranks as having the second-largest total workforce of technology professionals (behind California), thanks to a surge of economic development in niches such as mobile, big data and software development, according to the Dice.com findings. But if the South's relatively low cost of living and perpetually warm climate doesn't interest you, don't worry: We've also included high-growth states in the West, North and Midwest. Dice.com is an online jobs and career community for tech professionals. The research was compiled primarily through data provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

  • Digital estate planning is no longer an afterthought. There's a growing array of products and services addressing the needs of the digitally deceased.

  • When it comes to the employment picture, IT is creating a greater number of new positions than it's eliminating, according to recent research published by CareerBuilder. However, the technology industry is the main target for what's called "de-skilled" workers: those whose jobs are being replaced by automation. What's clear is that private industry, federal/state/local governments, and both K-12 and higher educational leaders will have to work together to boost students' interest and capabilities in fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). "While automation may eliminate some jobs, it also creates other jobs that are higher paying, and [that] lifts the standard of living for the economy as a whole," says Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder and co-author of The Talent Equation. "One of the greatest challenges the U.S. faces today is sufficiently preparing the workforce for the influx of more knowledge-based jobs that will likely result from progress in robotics and other STEM-related fields." Nearly 2,200 hiring managers and HR professionals took part in the research. Additional research was compiled through analysis of more than 785 occupations recognized by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

  • The financial services firm turned to advanced analytics to introduce virtual agents that assist military personnel who are transitioning into civilian life.

  • For many IT organizations, their resistance to adopting public clouds has given way to a more balanced perspective on the state of public cloud security.

  • To get the most out of your professional networking efforts, you need to do more than simply sign up for a LinkedIn group: You have to emerge as a high-profile, helpful and gracious member of your networking communities. However, findings reveal that many professionals make a number of classic mistakes in their networking efforts, according to a recent survey from OfficeTeam. These range from age-old basics such as poor manners (not saying "thanks") to the less obvious (failing to ask for help). It's also important not to limit networking to social media and other online outlets because you can often make a better impression at in-person meetings and business events. "Although networking online can be an effective way to establish professional relationships and keep in touch, the value of in-person activities like meeting for lunch or attending industry events can't be overlooked," says Robert Hosking, executive director of OfficeTeam. "Whether you're looking to land a new job or build your visibility, every connection counts. These gatherings allow you to put a face to a name." More than 300 U.S. senior managers took part in the research.

  • The majority of U.S. companies recognize that the cloud will play an essential role in innovation in the very near future. Yet, most enterprises don't have a clear cloud migration plan in place, according to a recent survey conducted by Oxford Economics for Windstream. The accompanying survey report, titled "The Path to Value in the Cloud," reveals that organizations are falling short when it comes to getting the right performance and ROI metrics in place to measure cloud-enabling success. There are also concerns about the cloud's impact on security, costs, platform compatibility and privacy. However, overall sentiments remain upbeat, as the cloud is expected to help increase geographic market expansion, business transformation, collaboration and other strategy drivers. "Cloud computing today is fundamentally altering business processes and changing the way organizations interact with customers, partners and employees," according to the report. "This transformation brings incredible opportunities, including the ability to build a real-time enterprise where interaction and innovation flourish." A total of 350 U.S. business and technology executives took part in the research.

  • Good networking is easy networking. The challenge is to find new ways to interact with peers. Here are four networking ideas that go beyond a standard meet-up.