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  • A significant share of IT and business decision-makers are turning to custom software applications to meet their business needs, according to a recent survey conducted by Forrester Consulting for Thoughtworks. The accompanying report, "Driving Innovation Using the Right Skills: The Value of Custom Software Development," indicates that these leaders are looking for more than just development skills in a custom software provider. They seek a strategic partner that can help transform their organization. For example, many consider a proven track record with agile development essential. When organizations find the right provider, they're usually willing to pay a premium for the apps—in some cases, more than 20 percent. "Business and IT leaders are under pressure to deliver a continuous stream of standout digital experiences," says Craig Gorsline, president and chief operating officer at ThoughtWorks. "In this environment, it's imperative that technology [be] at the core of the business strategy. The path to digital success is complex and requires a new approach—one that is iterative and adaptive, spanning multiple levels of the organization and providing quick time to value." A total of 200 global IT and business decision-makers at companies that at least partially outsource custom software development took part in the research.

  • This global freight company deployed a SaaS-based WAN and achieved speed increases as great as 300 percent and compression rates up to 95 times higher.

  • As the digital age unfolds, there's a growing need to focus security efforts on application vulnerabilities. Identifying and understanding the risks—as well as the potential repercussions—of different software vulnerabilities is critical. The recently released annual "Secunia Vulnerability Review 2015" offers a glimpse into emerging issues and trends, including the prevalence of vulnerabilities, the availability of patches, how organizations map security threats to IT infrastructures, and existing vulnerabilities in the 50 most popular applications on PCs. The security firm analyzed anonymous data from scans of millions of private computers using its Personal Software Inspector (PSI). In 2014, the firm found that application vulnerabilities increased by about 18 percent. "IT teams need to have complete visibility of the applications that are in use," advises Kasper Lindgaard, director of research and security at Secunia. "And they need firm policies and procedures in place in order to deal with vulnerabilities as they are disclosed."

  • A Professional Development Academy provides frontline IT managers with mentorship opportunities from Fortune 500 executives and business school instructors.

  • Creating a collaborative workplace that delivers benefits to both employers and employees requires a clear strategy, transparent goals and the right tech tools.

  • Professionals worldwide continue to work longer hours every week, according to a recent survey from Kensington. The computer accessory company reports that a significant number of professionals are working at least 50 hours a week. Given the always-connected culture that technology advances have helped create, employees also stay on the job while at home, checking email right before going to bed and shortly after getting up in the morning. Survey findings also cover a broad range of other work-life topics. While the majority of survey respondents reported that they are most comfortable working at their home, for example, most still work in a traditional office environment. Even if they work from their home and have a designated workstation there to support this arrangement, many still prefer to work while sitting on their couch. Regardless of where they get the job done—and which devices they use to do it—nearly all survey participants who started their career post-2000 said they expect to receive a BYOD (bring-your-own device) allowance this year. More than 3,225 global Kensington customers and visitors to Kensington.com took part in the research.

  • Over the last few years, cloud computing has moved into the mainstream of the enterprise,  emerging as a valuable tool for managing IT systems, software and data. Yet, while the technology solves many security problems, it also introduces new challenges. A recently released "Cloud Security Spotlight Report" from Cloud Research Partners sheds light on emerging issues and how enterprise business and IT leaders are coping with them. The survey of 1,000 cyber-security professionals identifies a number of key drivers and risk factors related to cloud adoption, including unauthorized access, hijacking of accounts and dealing with malicious insiders. Overall, nearly 90 percent of respondents expressed concern about security and data risk. "Cloud security is top of mind for cyber-security professionals," noted Holger Schulze, founder of the Information Security Community on LinkedIn, which partnered on the report. "The fundamental perception is that … security concerns [are] a critical barrier to faster adoption of cloud services."

  • Companies are open to existing vulnerabilities mainly because they never implemented security patches, but many breaches could be avoided with more vigilance.

  • When asked for a "top three" list of qualities they want from organizational leaders, a cross-section of generational employees ranked a strong sense of ethics, honesty and transparency at the top, according to a survey study from IBM. The accompanying report, "Myths, Exaggerations and Uncomfortable Truths," focuses primarily on perspectives held by Millennial workers. However, the findings also provide insights about both contrasting and shared sentiments among the three major workplace generations: Millennials, Generation X and Baby Boomers—especially when it comes to opinions about their leaders. As for the use of social media to gain a professional edge, Millennials predictably are well ahead of their Boomer colleagues. "The fundamental distinction between Millennials and older employees is their digital proficiency," according to the report. "Millennials are the first generation to grow up immersed in a digital world. Using mobile and social technologies; immediately accessing data, ideas and inspiration; and instantly communicating and collaborating [are] second nature for these digital natives." More than 1,780 employees worldwide took part in the research.

  • Densho deploys a streamlined storage strategy to boost efficiency and reduce costs for preserving 60,000 photographs, documents, video and historical items.

  • It's easy to build IT systems that turn simple problems into train wrecks. Companies need to design systems that are flexible enough to address—and fix—problems.

  • The complexity of information technology continues to increase at a rapid pace, and the spate of systems, devices and identities that CIOs and other IT leaders must manage is pushing many organizations beyond their current capabilities. A recent study conducted by identity services provider GlobalSign in conjunction with research firm Vanson Bourne reports that business and IT leaders are increasingly concerned about identity relationship and access management (IRAM) capabilities—particularly as the bring-your-own-device movement and the Internet of things (IoT) take hold. The firms surveyed more than 1,000 senior IT leaders at organizations in the United States and the United Kingdom that have more than 1,000 employees. The report identifies a number of key issues and trends, including the increasing popularity of BYOD and teleworking, as well as the rapidly growing number of devices connected to enterprise networks. Nevertheless, "There are many actionable steps that IT managers can take immediately," notes Joan Lockhart, CMO of GlobalSign. Here's a look at some of the key findings:

  • Copenhagen's S-Bane commuter rail uses next-gen connected solutions to build transportation systems that deliver real-time network management and security.

  • For IT and business leaders, the pressure to unveil new and updated technologies, systems and apps—while securing existing infrastructure—is overwhelming. Security concerns and risks seem to grow daily. Hackers and other cyber-criminals are smart, determined and well-funded. A recently released study commissioned by Trustwave, "2015 Security Pressures Report," offers insights into this rapidly changing space and how organizations are responding to it. The survey, which includes responses from more than 1,000 IT security professionals in the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada, found that there's growing pressure to roll out new technology projects (such as cloud and mobile applications) despite unresolved security issues. In addition, as security threats continue to grow, organizations are finding that they are understaffed and underfunded. Nevertheless, they must cope with mounting pressure from CEOs and other C-level executives to protect corporate information, and many must navigate increasingly complex IT environments that span partner organizations. Here are some of the key findings from the report:

  • Incident response simulations provide companies with a detailed approach for responding to a cyber-attack and seeing how decisions are made during a crisis.