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  • A clear majority of global organizations are either already implementing DevOps to produce applications or are planning to do so, according to a recent survey from Rackspace and Vanson Bourne. The accompanying report, titled "DevOps Adoption," reveals that teams using DevOps are increasing new-feature delivery, business efficiencies, app uptime, customer satisfaction and innovation. That helps create a more agile organization that can respond more swiftly to business and technology changes. "The momentum behind DevOps is driven by a perfect storm for disruption based on Internet business and collaboration technologies, open-source software and cloud computing," Chris Jackson, CTO of DevOps services for Rackspace, wrote in the report. "These technology shifts have placed new pressures on existing IT models and created opportunities for businesses to get value to customers faster, diversify the number of services they offer and use data more proactively to serve the business better." An estimated 700 IT decision-makers in the United States, the United Kingdom and Australia took part in the research.

  • Microsoft recently announced that it has released a mobile version of Office that allows editing and links to external cloud services at no additional cost.

  • A prominent footwear and athletic apparel retailer tackles customer engagement with a mobile app strategy that connects it with its core customers: Millennials.

  • Let's face it: Some employees would say anything to get out of work for a day. But it's very unlikely that you've worked with a professional who's resorted to some of the following outrageous excuses to call in sick, as compiled from a recent CareerBuilder survey. Overall, the percentage of professionals who call in sick when they're actually healthy is trending downward, but there are still a significant number of workers who do this. Many employers, in turn, are willing to check up on a staff member to make sure the absence is legitimate, most often by asking for a doctor's note. (Though it's hard to believe, quite a few workers who fake illnesses essentially give themselves up by posting comments about their duplicity on social media.) Fortunately, IT professionals are particularly good about using their sick days: Only 22 percent have called in for illnesses in the past year, which is far below the norm for employees in other professions. More than 3,100 workers and 2,200 hiring managers took part in the research.

  • How can you tell whether an IT project will be a boon or a bomb? And how can you spot the land mines in time to change course? Three disciplines can help.

  • So what really bothers you at work? If you're like many tech professionals, you're more likely to get frustrated over a lack of career growth and skills development than compensation, according to a recent survey from Robert Half Technology. IT professionals are also on edge about heavy workloads, and they're upset about rigid hierarchies that leave them with little autonomy to make strategic decisions. If companies expect to retain valuable tech staffers, they need to proactively address these issues. "Standing still isn't an option in technology today," says John Reed, senior executive director of Robert Half Technology. "IT workers worry about remaining relevant and marketable, and they look to their employers to help them acquire new skills and advance their careers. Often, the ability to learn and grow can be as important as a competitive compensation package." Along with highlighting the following biggest frustrations of IT employees, we're presenting Robert Half's examples of what good organizations do to keep IT pros happy. More than 2,300 North American IT workers took part in the research.

  • While IT department leaders said they provide a vast range of mobile tools to business-side employees, a surprisingly large number of those employees are unaware that the tools are available, according to a recent survey from harmon.ie. The accompanying report, "The State of Mobile Enterprise Collaboration 2014," reveals that technology is making it possible to share and update files, manage projects and pursue a variety of strategic objectives with mobile devices. However, a lack of organizationwide awareness about mobile capabilities is hurting the overall state of enterprise collaboration. "Mobile workers are still struggling to access critical business information increasingly distributed across multiple cloud services and enterprise applications," harmon.ie co-founder and CEO Yaacov Cohen wrote in the report. "To realize the true value of a mobile enterprise, collaboration needs to move well beyond where we are today. In today's competitive market, just giving workers the ability to send email … or exchange instant messages is simply not enough." More than 1,400 business and IT leaders took part in the research.

  • Women have joined the tech field in smaller numbers than men, are less likely to stay in the field, are promoted less often and are less likely to be satisfied.

  • For many organizations, the capability (or lack thereof) to conduct effective resource management and capacity planning amounts to a make-or-break proposition, according to a recent survey from Planview. The accompanying "2014 State of Resource Management and Capacity Planning Benchmark Report" reveals that companies that fall short in these areas face difficulties with respect to inaccurate resource estimates, project assignments, real-time reporting and demand visibility. The potential consequences include blown budgets and disgruntled customers. Clearly, IT departments should develop solutions that would avoid such situations. "Companies are rushing into new projects to drive business growth while sustaining the current state of business, all with a finite supply of shared human resources," says Linda Roach, vice president of marketing for Planview. "As a result, organizations over-commit and underutilize their resources, which negatively impact project timelines, business opportunities, customer satisfaction, innovation speed and budgets." The findings separate the experiences of "low maturity" and "high maturity" organizations in terms of resource management and capacity planning. A total of 480 global planning and resource leaders took part in the research, which was conducted by Appleseed Partners and OpenSky Research.

  • The University of San Francisco turned to asset management to generate reports with detailed asset data, giving it a clearer picture of needs moving forward.

  • Acorda Therapeutics turned to specialized file-sharing software to boost internal collaboration and connectedness, while ratcheting up security and IT controls.

  • Wouldn't it be great if we could learn from ancient legends such as Plato, Aristotle and Sophocles? Obviously, they have nothing to teach us about software code, the cloud or data analytics, but they certainly would inspire lively discussions about self-determination, character and other leadership-related themes. Of course, we can't make such a time-travel-enabled opportunity happen. But in the recent book The Ten Golden Rules of Leadership: Classical Wisdom for Modern Leaders (Amacom/available now), authors M.A. Soupios and Panos Mourdokoutas posit that the philosophies of classic thinkers remain relevant in today's workplace. By reading and examining their teachings, today's professionals and executives may discover that they don't have to compromise their values to pursue success. In fact, they may find that their integrity, as well as their dedication to the organization and colleagues rather than just themselves—will advance their career. Soupios is professor of political philosophy at Long Island University, and Mourdokoutas is professor and chair of the department of economics at Long Island University. The following "golden rules of leadership" quotes are adapted from their book

  • The New York Mets turn to big data and analytics to create higher levels of engagement with fans today, while working toward longer-term fandom down the road.

  • When preparing for a job interview, job candidates usually focus on coming up with great answers to employers' questions. But job seekers also should think seriously about the questions that they should pose to hirers during these sessions. A job interview is a prime opportunity for promising prospects to find out whether a company is a good fit. After all, a wide range of unforeseen negative developments could emerge after getting hired and starting the job. For instance, there could be limited opportunities for advancement if you end up in a job that receives little attention or respect. For another, your skills could stagnate due to a lack of organizational support for training. Or you could simply get bored with your tasks. To help you screen companies for these and other potential issues, we're presenting the following "must ask" job interview questions. Adapted from a list of questions from Janco Associates, they cover project assignments, career growth, evaluations, departmental transparency and other key topics you should address before accepting a job.

  • As if you needed any more proof that technology products dominate all others, check out this recent revelation: Eleven of the top products in the world are digital, according to a recent top 100 list published by Brand Keys. (The only non-tech product cracking the top dozen brands is Dunkin' Donuts coffee, which must mean that the list is absolutely legit.) After taking into consideration more than 720 brands representing 65 consumer categories, Brand Keys ranked the products according to customer loyalty and engagement assessments. Among the top 11 are familiar tech heavyweights such Amazon, Apple and Samsung. But the list also includes dominant social media sites, as well as a ubiquitous search engine. (We're talking about Google, of course.) All told, no less than 45 of the top 100 brands represent "consumer outreach and engagement via cellular and social networks, and the phones, smartphones, computers and tablets needed to meet the ever-increasing expectations related to outreach and personal connectivity that the consumer uses as a yardstick to measure brands," says Robert Passikoff, founder and president of Brand Keys. We're including the top 11 digital brands here, along with  interesting facts about them. Nearly 43,300 consumers took part in the research.