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  • The Internet of things is here, and IT must understand how to deploy the IoT effectively in order to prepare for the next phase of enterprise connectivity.

  • Professionals need to mind their manners in the workplace because behavior really does make a difference in a career, according to a survey from Accountemps. This can be challenging, especially when working in cramped cubicles and collaborative open spaces. "Workplace etiquette is about being aware of how your actions affect those around you," says Max Messmer, chairman of Accountemps and author of Managing Your Career For Dummies (John Wiley & Sons/available now). "Time constraints and external pressures aren't excuses for bad behavior. While it takes more than just good manners to rise through the ranks, displaying professional courtesy will help your career." As part of its research, Accountemps has compiled the following top office etiquette breaches. We've also included selected best practices for workplace decorum that were provided by the Columbia University Center for Career Education. More than 450 U.S. employees took part in the Accountemps research.

  • No organization can afford to ignore the potential of a disaster that could shut down operations. The results can be devastating. Consider these statistics: According to published research, 95 percent of companies experience a data outage within a year, and the average cost of downtime is $70,000 per hour. Even worse, seven out of 10 companies that experience a major data loss go out of business within a year. Despite the dangers, nearly three-quarters of organizations surveyed do not backup all of their virtual servers. Clearly, companies face formidable challenges as they pursue seamless business continuity. On the positive side, three out of five large organizations do have a continuity plan in place. Whether they have the right one in place is debatable. To assess whether your IT organization is on the right track, consider the following checklist of essential points of focus for disaster recovery and business continuity. These guidelines were adapted from recommendations posed by Janco Associates, and they cover everything from communications to risk management to social media to mobility.

  • The energy provider built a new IT platform to increase bill accuracy, manage customers and accounts more effectively, and improve the way it works with brokers.

  • If you want to move ahead in your career, it's important to command a skill that will enable you to write your own ticket in terms of job opportunities. Whether you're looking for greater schedule flexibility, telecommuting arrangements, an impressive title or a great salary, you'll be in a good bargaining position if you bring to the table one or more of these fastest-growing IT skills compiled by Dice.com. The company assembled the rankings based on trends analyzed within the technology jobs posted daily on its site, in terms of the skills most requested during the past year. They cover a broad range of hot tech niches, including cloud computing, big data, open-source development, mobility and project management, as well as two that deal with security. Overall, the company reports nearly 79,400 currently available positions, including more than 46,500 full-time ones. There are about 35,475 contractual openings, and about 620 jobs that are intended for telecommuters. Dice.com is an online jobs and career community for technology professionals.  

  • Janssen Pharmaceuticals taps next-generation analytics to transform product development and give clinicians access to data to help them make better decisions.

  • If you want to learn about the hottest programming languages today, don't miss this list from IEEE Spectrum. This respected organization, which has 400,000 members and is considered the world's largest association of technology professionals, enlisted the services of Nick Diakopoulos, a well-known computational journalist and assistant professor at the University of Maryland, to compile the language rankings. Diakopoulos proceeded by weighing and combining 12 metrics from 10 sources, including IEEE Xplore, Google and GitHub. The result is a compilation of languages that cover big data analytics, graphics, system administration, network programming and virtually every other tech-supported function. And if you disagree with Diakopoulos' conclusions—or want to see which language dominates within your particular tech niche (such as mobility)—that's not a problem: IEEE has posted an online, interactive version of the list that enables you to adjust the weight of each metric used to create the customized ranking.

  • Moving from a startup to a more established company calls for professional fine-tuning and, on the company’s part, ensuring the right managerial fit.

  • The demand for Linux professionals is growing. To help align employers and job seekers, the Linux Foundation has made two certifying exams available online.

  • Almost all workers occasionally complain about their jobs, but a recently released survey conducted by the Harris Poll for Spherion reports that an overwhelming majority of employees are at least somewhat happy at work. Whether motivated by money or rewarding, interesting roles and responsibilities, many employees are finding ways to achieve career contentment. That's encouraging, especially since a significant number of them describe their organizations as stressful environments. Surprisingly, when accepting a new job, many workers are willing to give up a lot for the sake of being happier in their career. For example, some are willing to sacrifice schedule flexibility, office privacy, and a lower position or job title. "[Workers] will go to extreme lengths and make sacrifices for the sake of finding job happiness," says Sandy Mazur, division president at Spherion. "Employers have a unique opportunity to capitalize on these findings and offer small, but meaningful, opportunities that can help workers be happy in their current roles. And that can pay big dividends for the employee and the employer." More than 2,015 workers took part in the research.

  • Over the last few years, the Internet of things has evolved from an intriguing concept into an increasingly sophisticated network of devices and machines. As more and more "things" get connected to the Internet—from Fitbit activity monitors and home lighting systems to industrial machines and aircraft—the stakes grow exponentially larger. Cisco Systems estimates that approximately 12.1 billion Internet-connected devices were in use in April 2014, and that figure is expected to zoom to above 50 billion by 2020. The networking firm also notes that about 100 things currently connect to the Internet every second, and the number is expected to reach 250 per second by 2020. Eventually, the IoT will encompass about 99 percent of all objects, which currently totals approximately 1.5 trillion things. "The IoT holds potential for disruptive change," says Gilad Meiri, CEO of tech startup Neura. "The evolution of the technology will likely be faster than the Internet." Following is a brief timeline  of important IoT events.

  • Today's consumer-centric business environment—with BYOD, apps and digital tools—has Apple's fingerprints all over it. That isn't about to change anytime soon.

  • IT leaders express overall satisfaction with the adoption of mobile applications within their companies, according to a recent survey from Apperian. And the resulting "2014 Executive Enterprise Mobility Report" reveals that CIOs have high hopes about the positive impact of mobile investments on business processes, employee satisfaction, cost savings and competitive advantage. Security, however, is still a top concern. That's not surprising, especially because the vast majority of IT executives don't know the extent of data and device loss among their mobile users. Another major struggle: Figuring out how to determine the ROI of mobile deployments. Regardless of the current obstacles, a significant number of survey participants said they will be equipping thousands of enterprise users with mobile apps for the immediate and foreseeable future. To ensure success, the report recommends that IT departments avoid making generic decisions, as "users have different needs and talents that must be taken into account. Think like a marketer, and create formal segmentation and improve it over time." An estimated 100 technology executives took part in the research.

  • With the rise of digital currencies like Bitcoin, anonymity and speed are increasingly attractive, but these features have drawn the attention of lawbreakers.

  • GE Capital CTO Eric Reed offers insights into how the financial services firm makes various IT systems work together in a streamlined and cost-efficient way.