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  • Whether a company needs increased resiliency or uptime, physical power or cooling upgrades, IT must understand the options and available migration methodologies.

  • The Super Bowl has become America's premier sporting event because it offers something for everyone: Even if you aren't a sports fan, the commercials are sure to entertain you, and the halftime show always features A-list musical talent, such as Katy Perry this year. And, of course, there's always the game, in which two of the very best teams in the NFL square off. With such star power on display, it's easy to see why companies are willing to spend more than $4 million for a typical 30-second commercial, and why tickets are averaging more than $4,800 on the secondary market, according to NerdWallet. But beyond the glitter, we realize that a great deal of professional work ethic, chemistry, leadership and flat-out talent goes into the performance on the field. After all, a team wins this game in part because of what its members are willing to do when they're not playing in front of television cameras. With this in mind, we're highlighting the admirable qualities of a number of the stars at Super Bowl XLIX—and their coaches—to convey how they would add value to an IT or business organization. Our list demonstrates why management should seek out a wide range of personalities and work approaches—and you won't need a $4,800 ticket to watch your work team produce championship results.

  • Cloud computing has moved into the mainstream of business and IT. Now it's time to build a strategic framework and effectively connect services and systems.

  • Do you ever get the feeling that instead of getting ahead at work, you're simply staying in place? Are you upset that you never get singled out for positive recognition or promotions? Do you feel that your colleagues and supervisors are trying to avoid you? Obviously, these are trouble signs that could eventually lead to a termination. In the recent book, Your Self-Sabotage Survival Guide: How to Go From Why Me? to Why Not? (Career Press/available now), author Karen Berg depicts the many ways in which professionals become their own worst enemies, lapsing into behaviors and work habits that hurt their performance and alienate them from peers and key influencers. To illustrate, we've included the following animal-themed classic types of career self-saboteurs, which are adapted from the book. While your own behavior and work practices probably won't descend to this level of dysfunction, you may recognize traces of yourself. And recognition is the first step toward a positive, corrective response. "We have to be as aware of ourselves and our actions as actors are at auditions," Berg writes in the book. "Everything we do needs to be treated like we're determined to clinch that big role. … That's why you need to set your mind on achieving, and work at it every day." Bert is a communication strategist and advisor to Fortune 500 C-suite executives.

  • A new generation of analytics tools is helping a growing number of companies derive bottom-line benefits from the ever-larger pools of data they're collecting.

  • If you think compensation is in the top spot on employees' wish lists, you're wrong. Today's professionals value more than salary. They want work-life factors such as job security, a flexible schedule and the potential for advancement, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. The findings focus on what employees really want when they're assessing a job opportunity. Many are looking for a job because they're dissatisfied with their current role: The majority of these individuals said their careers are stuck in neutral, and a significant number of them will look for a new employer this year. Other professionals are motivated to move on because they're not satisfied with their managers and/or aren't receiving adequate training. Because companies are struggling to recruit talented candidates for key positions, these employees feel that they'll have the upper hand during negotiations. "While the majority of workers say they're satisfied in their jobs, an expanding economy and widespread employment gains are motivating them to consider bigger, better opportunities," says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. "Skilled workers will have more leverage this year as the competition for labor becomes more intense across a variety of job functions. In response, employers expect to increase salaries on initial job offers in 2015, and may be more willing to negotiate other perks such as flexible work arrangements." More than 3,055 workers took part in the research.

  • For years, we've constantly referenced the phrase "consumerization of IT." That's because—with the emergence of the cloud, mobile devices and bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policies—many decisions about technology purchases have shifted from the IT organization to business departments and employees. However, tech organizations will have a greater say in IT acquisitions and deployments in 2015, according to a recently released forecast from Deloitte. The 14th edition of Deloitte's "Technology, Media & Telecommunications (TMT) Predictions" indicates that innovations related to the Internet of things (IoT), drones and 3D printing will play a lead role in the changes, as technology and business leaders will work together to determine which technologies will have the biggest business impact. "We are entering an extraordinary period where consumer technologies are finding increased adoption in the enterprise space," says Eric Openshaw, vice chairman of Deloitte LLP and the U.S. technology leader for Deloitte's technology, media and entertainment, and telecommunications industry practice in the Americas. "The amount of data we will see generated from connected devices will pave the way to measure interactions in a way not witnessed before, [and] will allow organizations to understand customer behaviors and purchase patterns in a whole new light." The following predictions are adapted from the report, including forecasts about nanosatellites and contact-free mobile payments, among other topics. Deloitte compiled its predictions based on hundreds of interviews with industry executives and commentators, as well as proprietary research programs involving tens of thousands of consumers and users worldwide.

  • A West Virginia hospital migrates to a storage and networking solution that helps improve overnight database back-up times and overall system performance.

  • The vast majority of organizations have already implemented DevOps or are planning to do so in the near future, according to a recent survey conducted by Vanson Bourne for CA Technologies. The accompanying report, "DevOps: The Worst-Kept Secret to Winning in the Application Economy," reveals that this software development method—which fuses the words development and operations—is credited with increasing collaboration among departments globally by 21 percent, while reducing the time spent fixing and maintaining applications by 18 percent. Other improvements include faster time to market, as well as greater customer adoption of a company's software and services. "The argument against DevOps is over," says Andi Mann, vice president, CA Technologies. "Global business and IT leaders understand that they need transformational strategies to meet increasing customer demand and win the competition." To take full advantage, however, IT departments will have to address concerns about security and compliance, while overcoming organizational complexities and staff resistance. A total of 1,425 global senior IT and business leaders took part in the research.

  • Business and IT leaders need to rethink a company's role in retraining employees and upgrading their skills to address new and evolving IT tasks and challenges.

  • These days, business is all about anticipating and managing change. Unfortunately, seven out of 10 change initiatives fail, according to research. In many cases, companies fall short because their corporate culture is ill-equipped to deal with any significant change. In the recent book Make Change Work for You: 10 Ways to Future-Proof Yourself, Fearlessly Innovate, and Succeed Despite Uncertainty (Perigee Trade/available now), author Scott Steinberg dispenses advice for individual employees and managers who seek to endure and succeed amid fast-shifting times. He also reveals a wide range of approaches that smart organizations employ to empower their workforce to thrive in a changing environment. These companies understand that nothing—whether good or bad—lasts forever. And they're constantly coaching and encouraging employee teams to make educated gambles, while challenging conventional wisdom. The following list of traits that smart companies have used to successfully deal with change is adapted from the book. Steinberg is CEO of TechSavvy Global, a management consulting and market research firm.

  • Integrating context-aware services with collaboration tools can improve the way companies share ideas, resolve issues and provide excellent customer service.

  • If you think California is the top state for programming jobs, guess again. According to recently released research from Experts Exchange, two states strongly associated with the nation's capital top the list for programming employment opportunities. (The Golden State does crack the top five, however.) Given that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects a 22 percent growth in software development jobs by 2022—double the anticipated growth for any other occupation—you'll likely want to know which regions are emerging as the most promising places to pursue a programming career. "Some of that growth will be seen in states like California and New York, which already show a high concentration of programmers and, thus, higher levels of competition," says Melanie Spatola, community manager for Experts Exchange, which is a global network for tech professionals. "On the other hand, states like Maryland have a relatively low number of qualified applicants for a growing number of jobs, making it the second most opportunity-rich state." The company compiled the research by cross-referencing online job postings, BLS statistics, Twitter data and geo-locations for programming jobs across the country.

  • When supervising workers with different personalities and work ethics, you must find a leadership style that's comfortable for you and works well for your team.

  • Organization leaders are getting impatient with the amount of time it takes to obtain results from data analytics, according to a recent survey from Alteryx. They feel it should take just hours—or possibly minutes—to gain insights from data, rather than the days or weeks that is often required. Much of the problem is related to a lack of data blending, as data frequently has to be pulled from a half-dozen or even dozens of sources. As a result, it takes too much time to get the right data together to make a decision, and organizations are losing sales opportunities, missing ROI targets and incurring heavy operational expenses. With an approach that enables analysts in line-of-business groups to blend their own data, companies can avoid these issues. "The reality is that analysts face major challenges in creating the datasets that address the business questions they are looking to answer," says Paul Ross, vice president of product marketing at Alteryx. "[There are] revenue and profit opportunities that are being missed, and that should be a rallying cry for business leaders to empower their analysts to be able to deliver insights in hours, instead of the weeks typical of traditional processes." More than 200 analytics and business leaders took part in the research.