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  • For companies to succeed in the future, they will have to meet the high standards and requirements that Millennials have for mobile technologies and functions. For example, a significant percentage of young adults in the workforce want to use their smartphone's camera to perform daily tasks, such as depositing checks, signing up for health insurance and paying bills, according to a recent survey from Mitek. Why wouldn't they, when they use cameras to record virtually every aspect of their lives? Given the dominance of image-driven capabilities on mobile tools, IT departments should start thinking—now, rather than later—about how to adapt their consumer-facing services to accommodate camera-based interactions, rather than asking customers to manually type information into a field. "While it shouldn't be surprising that [Millennials'] smartphones never leave their sides, we also found that the role of the camera on a mobile device cannot be minimized," says James DeBello, Mitek's president and CEO. "The love of snapping selfies could be written off as a fad, but Millennials are telling us that this is how they want to bank, shop, find health care and enroll in classes." More than 1,000 U.S. Millennials took part in the research.

  • An integration specialist offers insights into how the next version of the Windows OS will affect the enterprise, including migration and deployment concerns.

  • According to a recent survey, the best tech company in the world is not Google, Twitter or any of the other "usual suspects" that frequently dominate "best employer" lists. Instead, it's a company that specializes in the more traditional world of cloud-based human resources and finance applications. But don't worry: Google and Twitter still show up in this top 10 list, which was published by Great Place to Work's "Great Rated!" Companies were selected based on average scores provided by nearly 50,000 employee survey participants. Great Rated! has actually cited 20 companies overall, broken down into categories of large enterprises and small/medium businesses, but the following is the top 10 ranking. Given the well-reported struggles that organizations in all industries face in hiring qualified technology professionals, most could probably benefit from introducing at least some of the following cultural practices of these tech companies. (The cultural practices were compiled from news articles and online job reviews, as well as the companies' Websites.)

  • Chambers Gasket & Manufacturing integrated its cloud-based CRM and ERP systems, enabling staff to access customer data on their mobile devices from any location.

  • When it's time to make a major decision at your organization—one that can translate into a significant profit or loss over the next year—how do your senior executives proceed? Do they rely on intuition or data analytics? A research report from PwC conveys a mixed portrait: Executives worldwide said they recognize the growing influence big data has on critical business strategies and decisions. However, they also reported that their own experience and instincts—as well as those of colleagues and employees—play a major role. In other words, companies are moving forward with a balanced blend of human and metrics-based thinking. "A company's success today is tied to how good it is at making big decisions," says Dan DiFilippo, PwC's global and U.S. data and analytics leader. "While executives say they continue to rely on experience, advice or their own gut instinct, they also see investment in data and analytics as critical to success. Experience and intuition and the use of data and analytics are not mutually exclusive. The challenge for business is how best to marry the two." A total of 1,135 global senior executives took part in the research.

  • As long as data isn't misused or abused, what could be fairer than paying for products and services based on actual consumption rather than aggregate models?

  • Just when you've gotten used to Windows 8, get ready for yet another version of the operating system: After a public preview this fall, Microsoft anticipates releasing Windows 10 in mid-2015. It's expected to serve as the most enterprise-focused version yet, with a lot of emphasis on productivity-boosting business features. As a multiplatform product, it will run on PCs, tablets, Windows Phones and eventually the Xbox. Many users will be happy to learn that the original Start button and Menu are coming back. (Microsoft ditched both with Windows 8.) And the new version won't abruptly switch you from a traditional Windows layout to that funky app interface, because all programs will appear in the customary Windows setting we're all used to. You may wonder why Windows 10 isn't named "Windows 9." (Did Microsoft think we wouldn't notice?) Promising to transform the brand to align with the fast pace of consumer-driven technology changes, Microsoft points out that the number "10" represents "a whole new generation of Windows." So you can expect quicker, more incremental Windows releases now—instead of grand debuts—to mirror the way mobile apps get updated. Given the interest in this operating system, we're presenting the following 11 fascinating facts about the long line of Windows products—facts that were compiled from news accounts and online resources.

  • A new study shows that most data scientists around the world believe a set of ethical standards should exist when it comes to data collection and research.

  • IT professionals should benefit significantly from a surge in job creation over the next few years, according to research published by Modis IT Staffing. The accompanying report, the "2015 Salary Guide for IT Professionals," predicts that the growth of new technology jobs being created will rise at a far higher rate than overall employment growth. In addition, women will account for a greater share of the overall IT workforce. It's also encouraging to learn that a significant number of U.S. men and women serving overseas consider technology the top vocational choice for their post-military careers, according to the survey. The guide breaks out a number of key IT niches for job growth—along with average salary figures within each niche—and we're presenting some of those statistics in the slideshow below. As a bonus, we're also including best practices for getting that perfect and well-paying tech job. Modis has based its findings on information obtained through a partnership with CareerBliss and its internal data, as well as that from local clients and IT professionals in the market.

  • The growing demand for self-service analytics that will give employees better, easier access to data was a major focus at the 2014 Dreamforce conference.

  • Some industry experts view mobility as the foundation of the digital enterprise, which will include the Internet of things, social, analytics and crowdsourcing.

  • Do you ever feel like you're drowning in a sea of overused buzzwords and phrases at work? That's not surprising: These hackneyed terms are constantly dropped both in one-on-one conversations and large meetings, essentially serving as verbal crutches for professionals who don't feel comfortable using simpler, more direct terms. While using business and technology jargon may make you feel smarter or "in the know," the constant use of these words quickly wears thin on listeners, who may decide to tune you out. With this in mind, Accountemps has come up with the following list of the most annoying workplace buzzwords and phrases, taken from a recent survey the company published. We're sure you've heard these terms before—probably far too often—but it's important to recognize these conversational clunkers so you can avoid using them in the future. "Clarity is still king when communicating in the workplace," says Bill Driscoll, New England district president of Accountemps. "Jargon tends to confuse, not clarify. It's generally best to avoid the tired clichés and trendy buzzwords in favor of clear, straightforward language." More than 600 human resources managers in the United States and Canada took part in the research. Feel free to add your hated buzzwords in our Comments section at the bottom of this page.

  • Balancing productivity and security is a growing minefield for organizations, particularly as the consumerization of IT accelerates and BYOD (bring your own device) reaches deeper into the fabric of companies. A recent report, "Security in the New Mobile Ecosystem," examines the impact of mobile devices, mobile apps and the mobile workforce—essentially the mobile ecosystem—on the overall security outlook of organizations in the United States. The report, commissioned by Raytheon and independently conducted by the Ponemon Institute, found that while most companies are implementing mobile security measures, practices aren't keeping up with the rapidly changing marketplace and the proliferation of mobile devices. "Despite the increasingly high levels of cyber-security risks with mobile devices, the top two methods being used today—Mobile Device Management (MDM) and secure containers—are not sufficient," explains Ashok Sankar, senior director of product management and strategy at Raytheon Cyber Products. In addition, "Companies need to alleviate employee fears by ensuring that their user experience does not change, and their private data is not compromised, viewed or removed from their devices at the discretion of the company." The Ponemon Institute surveyed 618 technology and IT security professionals.

  • A European energy company revamps communication and collaboration so that 3,500-plus employees can share project plans, contracts and many types of documents.

  • The growing popularity of online video in enterprises is not a surprise, but a recent survey of more than 1,000 executives reveals just how important both live and on-demand videos have become as business tools. The findings of the survey, which was conducted by Wainhouse Research on behalf of Qumu, a provider of corporate video technology, suggest that a lot of companies are readying themselves to make online video a bigger priority in the coming years. "As enterprise video usage continues to accelerate, IT departments are being forced to rethink their storage and networking strategies and to integrate video into their enterprise content management infrastructures," said Vern Hanzlik, executive vice president and general manager of Qumu. "Video is a powerful form of communication, both internally and externally, but it needs to be secure, easy to use and implemented in a way that does not bring the network down to its knees." The author of the report, Wainhouse senior analyst Steve Vonder Haar, concluded that because their use of video is skyrocketing, enterprises will play a major role in driving innovation in the video-streaming world.