Cleaning House

By Brian P. Watson  |  Posted 2007-02-02 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Say goodbye to the Web you know and hello to the Web you've always wanted. A variety of frameworks for building rich Internet applications are helping companies save time and money.

CLEANING HOUSE

User experience also was vital to Jonathan Jaffe, software development manager with Weitz & Luxenberg, a medical malpractice and personal injury law firm.

For Jaffe, client-server applications were easy to deploy and use; still, they lacked drag-and-drop features and needed to refresh pages from the server. "They didn't offer that immediacy that a rich Internet application offers," Jaffe says.

The firm, a longtime Microsoft shop, began using its .NET application framework four years ago and in 2005 upgraded to ASP.NET, a development platform for Web sites, applications and services. Using the platform, Jaffe and his team rewrote the firm's proprietary enterprise resource planning system, which held more than 100,000 components including client records and accounting applications.

For some major litigation, the firm receives 60 terabytes of medical records and correspondence. To sort through that load by hand would be impossible, according to Jaffe. With the Web-based system, built in 2005, he says lawyers and support staff can search the firm's ERP system—via an interface built into ASP.NET—and instantly obtain case-related details.

Some recent projects with ASP.NET, including an ordering system for medical documents, took about a week to create, Jaffe says. Using older technologies, he says they could have taken six months. And that, he adds, helped save the firm $150,000 in outsourced software development costs.



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Associate Editor

Brian joined Baseline in March 2006. In addition to previous stints at Inter@ctive Week and The Net Economy, he's written for The News-Press in Fort Myers, Fla., as well as The Sunday Tribune in Dublin, Ireland. Brian has a B.A. from Bucknell University and a master's degree from Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

 
 
 
 
 
 

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