Survey: CIOs Put Out Help-Wanted Sign for Business-Savvy IT Professionals

By Allan Alter  |  Posted 2006-08-15 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Hiring will increase for programmers, systems developers, project managers and business analysts who really understand business.

Our first two findings presented evidence that IT organizations are growing. But where will the growth come? Our latest finding covers the hiring outlook for 18 different IT positions, and finds that the demand for new systems and infrastructure is leading to more hiring for IT professionals who can build them. But today, this requires business as well as technical know-how, a combination of skills IT executives expect will be difficult to find.

For more data and analysis, see CIO Insight 's Research Center blog at go.cioinsight.com/researchcentral

Finding 3: CIOs are looking for business-savvy technologists to build new systems.
Large and midsize companies are ramping up hiring in programming and systems development; also in demand are professionals in project management, business-process redesign, business analysis and systems integration. The message to IT professionals is clear: A need exists in the U.S. for talented technicians who can be businesspeople, too, especially if they can function in a global economy.





Research Guide:

  • Finding 1: IT organizations are getting larger, not smaller.
  • Finding 2: Large companies are relying on contractors, outsourcers and H1B visa holders.
  • Finding 3: CIOs are looking for business-savvy technologists to build new systems.

    Read our previous surveys on the IT organization's current state and future:

  • The IT Organization: Why is Morale So Bad? (November 2004)
  • The Future of IT (January 2005)
  • The Future of IT 2004 : What's in Store for Today and Tomorrow? (January 2004)

    Related stories:

  • The Downside of Managing Up: Can a CIO Be Too Strategic? (February 2005)
  • Culture Clash – Special Issue on Alignment issue (October 15, 2004)
  • Labor Pains (October 2003)
  • Case study: Johnson & Johnson and Managing IT (December 2001)


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    Executive Editor

    Allan Alter has been a specialist on information technology management, strategy and leadership for many years. Most recently, he was editor-in-chief and the director of new content development for the MIT Sloan Management Review. He has been a columnist and department editor at Computerworld, where he won three awards from the American Society of Business Press Editors. Previously he was a special projects editor, senior editor and senior writer for CIO magazine. Earlier, Alter was an associate editor for Mass High Tech. He has edited two books: The Squandered Computer: Evaluating the Business Alignment of Business Technologies and Redesigning the Firm.

     
     
     
     
     
     

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