Half of All Job Candidates Don't Negotiate Pay

 
 
By Dennis McCafferty  |  Posted 2013-09-24 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

If you're like nearly one-half of job candidates out there, you're literally leaving money on the table when you get hired. That's because a notable number of employers say they're willing to negotiate on that initial salary proposal, but many workers accept the first one dangled in front of them, according to a recent survey from CareerBuilder. And here's a not-so-well-kept secret among a number of employers: They build a negotiated compensation figure into the process of extending a final offer, so that first number is usually not a take-it-or-leave-it offer. IT workers, in particular, are in good position to negotiate, CareerBuilder reports. "When job seekers take the first number given to them, they are oftentimes undervaluing their market worth," says Rosemary Haefner, vice president of human resources at CareerBuilder. "Not every hiring manager will be able to raise the offer, but it's never a bad idea to negotiate—especially if you have experience and possess in-demand technical skills." CareerBuilder has also provided the following salary forecast: More than one-half of employers expect to give salary increases of less than 5 percent in the next year, and only 16 percent expect raises of 5 percent or more. Most say that the increases will mostly cover cost-of-living adjustments, although rewarding employee tenure, discouraging turnover, compensating for heavier workloads and offsetting competitive offers are also playing a role in many increases. More than U.S. 2,017 hiring managers and HR professionals, as well as nearly 3,000 workers, took part in the research.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dennis McCafferty is a freelance writer for Baseline Magazine.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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