10 Cannot Miss RSA Conference Sessions

By Ericka Chickowski  |  Posted 2008-04-04 Email Print this article Print

The annual security-fest at the RSA Conference begins April 7. If you’re currently planning your meetings and sessions schedule, be sure to consider the following track sessions.


Heading to the 2008 RSA Security Conference in San Francisco? Baseline has some advice for you. Here are some of the best sessions that you might want to get an early seat at as they are sure to be crowded. 

1. The Cryptographers' Panel

Time: Tuesday, April 8, 10:25 AM

Speakers: Burt Kaliski Founding Scientist, RSA Laboratories and Director, EMC Innovation Network, EMC Corporation; Ronald Rivest, Viterbi Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, MIT; Martin Hellman, Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University; Adi Shamir, Professor, Computer Science Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel; Whitfield Diffie, Vice President and Fellow Chief Security Officer, Sun Microsystems

The Cryptographers’ Panel is an annual favorite at RSA, and usually the scions of cryptography that convene for this panel have some new or interesting breakthrough to drop on attendees during the lively discussion.

2. The Seven Most Dangerous New Attack Techniques, and What's Coming Next

Time: Tuesday, April 8, 1:30 PM

Speakers: Alan Paller, Director of Research, SANS Institute; Ed Skoudis, Fellow, SANS Institute; Rohit Dhamankar, Senior Manager of Security Research, TippingPoint; Johannes Ullrich, Chief Technology Officer, SANS Institute

The SANS Institute and its partners have their fingers to the pulse of security trends, which is why Baseline chooses this session as the best bet for learning about new attack techniques.

3. Solving the Transitive Access Problem for SOA

Time: Tuesday, April 8, 5:40 PM
Speaker: Alan Karp, Principal Scientist, Hewlett-Packard

As deployments of service-oriented architecture rise, enterprises are learning that this flexible architecture is leaving a passel of security woes in its wake. Chief among the concerns are access rights issues. Check out this session to learn about how researchers are finding ways to work around these problems.


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