dcsimg
 
 

ZIFFPAGE TITLECanadian Firearm Registry

By Mel Duvall  |  Posted 2004-07-01 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 

A national computerized firearm registry in Canada was supposed to cost taxpayers $2 million. Instead, it has held them up for more than $1 billion.

: A Shot in the Dark">

Canadian Firearm Registry: A Shot in the Dark



High price for safety: When the Canadian government proposed building a computerized database to track the estimated 7 million firearms in the country, it said the project would cost about $119 million Canadian ($88 million U.S.) to implement. Those costs were to be offset by $117 million in gun-owner registration fees, leaving taxpayers with a bill for $2 million. Instead, costs have soared to more than $1 billion.

1998

  • New Firearms Act requires all gun owners to be licensed and all guns registered.
  • Of estimated 7.9 million guns, 20,000 are registered.

    1999

  • Errors in processing raise cost of each registration to $16.28 from original $4.60 estimate.
  • Annual owner fees total $300,000, up from $100,000.

    2000

  • Every gun owner required to have valid license by Dec. 31.
  • Fee for firearm license reduced to $10 from $45.

    2001

  • Government extends amnesty program to Dec. 31, 2002, to turn in newly restricted weapons such as .25 and .32 caliber handguns.
  • 1.5 million guns registered.

    2002

  • Canadian auditor general says registry costs will exceed $1 billion.
  • Fees received from owners reach $4.3 million, up from $1.5 million.

    2003

  • Despite controversy, majority of Canadians meet registration deadline.
  • 7 million guns registered, representing 88% of total firearms believed to exist in Canada.

    Sources: Office of the Auditor General of Canada, HLB Decision Economics Review, Hession Report, Baseline Research



  • <1234>
     
     
     
     
    Contributing Editor
    Mel Duvall is a veteran business and technology journalist, having written for a variety of daily newspapers and magazines for 17 years. Most recently he was the Business Commerce Editor for Interactive Week, and previously served as a senior business writer for The Financial Post.

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

    Submit a Comment

    Loading Comments...
    eWeek eWeek

    Have the latest technology news and resources emailed to you everyday.

    By submitting your information, you agree that baselinemag.com may send you Baselinemag offers via email, phone and text message, as well as email offers about other products and services that Baselinemag believes may be of interest to you. Baselinemag will process your information in accordance with the Quinstreet Privacy Policy.

    Click for a full list of Newsletterssubmit