IBM Links Google Gadgets to WebSphere Portal

By John Pallatto  |  Posted 2007-02-28 Email Print this article Print
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

IBM's move to integrate Google Gadgets with its WebSphere Portal will help bring Google's information-services applets to a wider enterprise audience.

Google gained a major new ally in its campaign to extend its applications and information services deeper into the enterprise with IBM's Feb. 28 announcement that it has integrated Google Gadgets with its WebSphere Portal.

Customers who use WebSphere Portal to build corporate Web sites will have access to more than 4,000 Google Gadgets, which are compact, pre-programmed applets and Web services that provide links to a variety of online information services, said Steven Ricketts, IBM's WebSphere Portal program director.

They include links to research databases, package delivery tracking systems, newswires, maps, podcast searches or YouTube videos—virtually any kind of information service that might be relevant to a business or consumer Web portal, he said.

The Google Gadgets in effect are being added to the thousands of pre-programmed WebSphere business application "portlets" that IBM already offers through its online catalog.

IBM, based in Armonk, N.Y., also introduced a search site map utility, a site map protocol designed to make it easier for public search engines to find and index fresh content on corporate Web sites. The utility also provides gives Web sites the ability to notify search engines as to how frequently content is updated, the priority of the content and the last modification date. More information about the site map protocol can be found here.

Read the full story on eWEEK.com: IBM Links Google Gadgets to WebSphere Portal.



 
 
 
 
John Pallatto John Pallatto is eWEEK.com's Enterprise Applications Center editor. His near 30 years of experience as a professional journalist began as a member of the founding staff of PC Week in March 1984. Pallatto was PC Week's West Coast bureau chief, a senior editor at Ziff Davis' Internet Computing magazine and the West Coast bureau chief at Internet World magazine.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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